Thursday, January 24, 2013
From Bryce Covert of The Nation:
Domestic workers often have no limit to the hours they work, are rarely entitled to rest periods, don’t make minimum wage and aren’t guaranteed maternity leave. More than half have no upper limit on the normal weekly hours that they are expected to work. Just under half aren’t entitled to any weekly rest period. Just over 40 percent are not entitled to any minimum wage. The percentage who are entitled to the same maternity leave as other workers is a bit more promising—nearly two-thirds work under such conditions. But over 35 percent have no legal entitlement to maternity leave at all, despite such a female-heavy workforce.
This is why we need to ratify the ILO Convention on Domestic Work.  Only three countries - Uruguay, the Philippines, and Mauritius - have ratified it.  When I attended the discussions surrounding the ILO Convention in 2010 and in 2011, it was clear to me that a lot of countries, particularly Canada and EU Member States, were resistant to the idea of thinking of domestic work as ‘work.’  Let’s lobby our countries and fight for greater protections for domestic workers!

From Bryce Covert of The Nation:

Domestic workers often have no limit to the hours they work, are rarely entitled to rest periods, don’t make minimum wage and aren’t guaranteed maternity leave. More than half have no upper limit on the normal weekly hours that they are expected to work. Just under half aren’t entitled to any weekly rest period. Just over 40 percent are not entitled to any minimum wage. The percentage who are entitled to the same maternity leave as other workers is a bit more promising—nearly two-thirds work under such conditions. But over 35 percent have no legal entitlement to maternity leave at all, despite such a female-heavy workforce.

This is why we need to ratify the ILO Convention on Domestic Work.  Only three countries - Uruguay, the Philippines, and Mauritius - have ratified it.  When I attended the discussions surrounding the ILO Convention in 2010 and in 2011, it was clear to me that a lot of countries, particularly Canada and EU Member States, were resistant to the idea of thinking of domestic work as ‘work.’  Let’s lobby our countries and fight for greater protections for domestic workers!

Notes

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